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To Verify System Requirements

This topic provides information on how to verify that you system meets the minimum prerequisites to install and run the Anypoint Platform Private Cloud Edition.

Install Required Software Packages

Yum is an open-source command-line package-management utility for Linux operating systems using the RPM Package Manager.

Through Yum, install the tool LVM. LVM (Logical Volume Manager) is a tool that adds a layer of abstraction between your operating system and the disks/partitions it uses. You can install LVM through the following command:

sudo yum install lvm2
You must have root access to perform this installation.

Uninstall Unsupported Packages

The following sections describe software that may cause conflicts with Anypoint Platform Private Cloud Edition. You must uninstall these components before performing the installation.

Disk Performance Verification

To Verify Disk Performance

To measure disk throughput, use a tool such as hdparm. On CentOS, hdparm can be installed by running

sudo yum install -y hdparm

To Test Disk Throughput

All disks should have at least 300 MB/sec of throughput. Use the following command to verify the throughput of your disk:

sudo hdparm -d <device>

The command outputs the following:

$ sudo hdparm -t /dev/sdd

/dev/sdd:
Timing buffered disk reads: 4726 MB in  3.00 seconds = 1574.94 MB/sec

You can also measure throughput using the dd tool. dd writes directly to the specified file, even if it is a device. Do not use this tool on a bare devices. Instead, after a device is formatted and mounted, you can write to a file on that device to measure throughput.

$ sudo mount /dev/sdb /var/lib/gravity # must be already formatted!
$ sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/var/lib/gravity/testfile count=1000 bs=1M
1000+0 records in
1000+0 records out
1048576000 bytes (1.0 GB, 1000 MiB) copied, 0.382535 s, 2.7 GB/s

The dd command provides less accurate information than hdparm, but is available on most operating systems and provides the ability to easily verify general disk performance.

Test Disk IOPS

Depending on your hardware or virtualization provider, you may be able to configure disk I/O operations per second (IOPS). Using a tool like iops (available here https://benjamin-schweizer.de/files/iops/iops-2011-02-11), you can verify available IOPS:

$ sudo ./iops --time 2 /dev/xvdb
/dev/xvdb, 107.37 GB, 32 threads:
 512   B blocks: 1893.0 IO/s, 946.5 KiB/s (  7.8 Mbit/s)
   1 KiB blocks: 1354.8 IO/s,   1.3 MiB/s ( 11.1 Mbit/s)
   2 KiB blocks: 1091.8 IO/s,   2.1 MiB/s ( 17.9 Mbit/s)
   4 KiB blocks:  807.1 IO/s,   3.2 MiB/s ( 26.4 Mbit/s)
   8 KiB blocks:  803.7 IO/s,   6.3 MiB/s ( 52.7 Mbit/s)
  16 KiB blocks:  787.4 IO/s,  12.3 MiB/s (103.2 Mbit/s)
  32 KiB blocks:  700.8 IO/s,  21.9 MiB/s (183.7 Mbit/s)
  64 KiB blocks:  590.0 IO/s,  36.9 MiB/s (309.3 Mbit/s)
 128 KiB blocks:  327.6 IO/s,  40.9 MiB/s (343.5 Mbit/s)
...

Docker

Docker should be uninstalled from servers running the Anypoint Platform Private Cloud Edition. The Anypoint Platform installation includes a Docker package officially supported by Kubernetes.

Local DNS Servers

Local caching DNS servers listening on port 53 should be removed, e.g. named, dnsmasq, bind or others.

Device Requirements

For the platform’s configuration you must assign four dedicated devices for use. One as a system state directory, one holds application data, another holds cluster information and the final device is used as a target for Docker devicemapper configuration.

Anypoint system data device

The main purpose of the system state directory is to store system configuration and metadata - for example, database and packages among other things. As package sizes can be arbitrary large, it is important to estimate the minimum size requirements and allocate enough space as a dedicated device ahead of time.

This device will be formatted either as xfs or ext4 and mounted as /var/lib/gravity. You can use the following shell snippet to guide this process (be sure to specify the correct device name in 2 places).

The following is provided only as an example, and should not be used as-is in production. Formatting and mounting disks is something that should be done by your system administrator. The end result of this is mounting the Anypoint system data device to the path /var/lib/gravity. This can be achieved using systemd mount files as shown in the example below, or /etc/fstab, or some other method. Please consult with your system administrator to determine the best way to meet this requirement.

sudo mkfs.ext4 /dev/<device name>
sudo mkdir -p /var/lib/gravity
echo -e "[Mount]\nWhat=/dev/<device name>\nWhere=/var/lib/gravity\nType=ext4\n[Install]\nWantedBy=local-fs.target" | sudo tee /etc/systemd/system/var-lib-gravity.mount
sudo systemctl daemon-reload
sudo systemctl enable var-lib-gravity.mount
sudo systemctl start var-lib-gravity.mount

etcd device

The main purpose of the etcd device is to provide dedicated storage for a distributed database used for cluster coordination. It does not require much space, 20GB should be enough.

This device will be formatted either as xfs or ext4 and mounted as /var/lib/gravity/planet/etcd. You can use the following shell snippet to guide this process (be sure to specify the correct device name in 2 places).

The following is provided only as an example, and should not be used as-is in production. Formatting and mounting disks is something that should be done by your system administrator. The end result of this is mounting the Etcd device to the path /var/lib/gravityi/planet/etcd. This can be achieved using systemd mount files as shown in the example below, or /etc/fstab, or some other method. Please consult with your system administrator to determine the best way to meet this requirement.

sudo mkfs.ext4 /dev/<device name>
sudo mkdir -p /var/lib/gravity/planet/etcd
echo -e "[Mount]\nWhat=/dev/<device name>\nWhere=/var/lib/gravity/planet/etcd\nType=ext4\n[Install]\nWantedBy=local-fs.target" | sudo tee /etc/systemd/system/var-lib-gravity-planet-etcd.mount
sudo systemctl daemon-reload
sudo systemctl enable var-lib-gravity-planet-etcd.mount
sudo systemctl start var-lib-gravity-planet-etcd.mount

Anypoint application data device

The main purpose of application data directory is storing application configuration and data. The amount of space required should be at minimum 250GB, but might vary depending on your specific use case. It is important to estimate the minimum size requirements and allocate enough space as a dedicated device ahead of time.

This device will be formatted either as xfs or ext4 and mounted as /var/lib/data. You can use the following shell snippet to guide this process (be sure to specify the correct device name in 2 places).

The following is provided only as an example, and should not be used as-is in production. Formatting and mounting disks is something that should be done by your system administrator. The end result of this is mounting the Anypoint application data device to the path /var/lib/data. This can be achieved using systemd mount files as shown in the example below, or /etc/fstab, or some other method. Please consult with your system administrator to determine the best way to meet this requirement.

sudo mkfs.ext4 /dev/<device name>
sudo mkdir -p /var/lib/data
echo -e "[Mount]\nWhat=/dev/<device name>\nWhere=/var/lib/data\nType=ext4\n[Install]\nWantedBy=local-fs.target" | sudo tee /etc/systemd/system/var-lib-data.mount
sudo systemctl daemon-reload
sudo systemctl enable var-lib-data.mount
sudo systemctl start var-lib-data.mount

Docker device

This device is used by Docker’s Device Mapper storage driver. You must have at least 100Gb sized allocated for the Device Mapper directory. With devices 50Gb and less the system performance will degrade dramatically or might not work at all.

Unless specified, Docker configuration defaults to using Device Mapper in loop back mode using /dev/loopX devices. However, this setting is not recommended for production environments. To configure Docker to use a dedicated device for Device Mapper storage driver, an unformatted device or partition, for example /dev/sdd, can be provided during installation. This directory is automatically configured.

Unformatted devices are automatically discovered by agents running on each node. Discovered devices are offered from a drop-down menu for configuration before starting the installation.

You can list unmounted devices with the following command:

lsblk --output=NAME,TYPE,SIZE,FSTYPE -P -I 8,9,202|grep 'FSTYPE=""'

Unmounted devices have an empty value in FSTYPE column. Devices with TYPE="part" are partitions on another device. This command only lists specific device types:

Device type

Description

8

SCSI disk devices

9

Metadisk (RAID) devices

202

Xen virtual block devices (Amazon EC2)

To Manually Reset Devices and Partitions

Logical Volume Manager allows one to group multiple physical volumes into a single storage volume (Volume Group) and then divide these into Logical Volumes. Physical Volumes are either a whole device or a partition.

In some cases when a device is in use by another logical volume or you want to manually reset a device previously configured for Device Mapper the following commands may be useful.

The Logical Volume Manager tool set consists of the following commands:

  • dmsetup: enables you to perform low-level logical volume management

  • pvdisplay, pvcreate, and pvremove: enable you to configure specific LVM object types.

To reset a device use the following commands:

  • lvremove -f docker/thinpool: enables you to determine with volume to remove.

  • vgremove docker: removes the volume group. Use this command with vgdisplay to locate the volume group to remove.

  • pvremove /dev/<device name>: removes the physical volume and resets device.

  • pvdisplay: enables you to find the physical volume to remove and the device name where it is running.