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MUnit Maven Plugin

MUnit provides a Maven plugin that allows you to run your MUnit tests as part of your continuous integration environment.

Setting Up MUnit Maven Plugin

This documentation assumes you have the <munit.version> property in your pom.xml.

  • Enable the MUnit Maven plugin in your pom.xml file:

    MUnit Maven Plugin
    <build>
      <plugins>
      ...
    
        <plugin>
          <groupId>com.mulesoft.munit.tools</groupId>
          <artifactId>munit-maven-plugin</artifactId>
          <version>${munit.version}</version>
          <executions>
            <execution>
              <id>test</id>
              <phase>test</phase>
              <goals>
                <goal>test</goal>
              </goals>
            </execution>
          </executions>
        </plugin>
    
      ...
      </plugins>
    </build>
  • Add MUnit dependencies to your pom.xml file:

    Dependencies
    <dependencies>
      ...
      <dependency>
        <groupId>com.mulesoft.munit</groupId>
        <artifactId>munit-runner</artifactId>
        <version>${munit.version}</version>
        <classifier>mule-plugin</classifier>
        <scope>test</scope>
      </dependency>
      <dependency>
        <groupId>com.mulesoft.munit</groupId>
        <artifactId>munit-tools</artifactId>
        <version>${munit.version}</version>
        <classifier>mule-plugin</classifier>
        <scope>test</scope>
      </dependency>
      ...
    </dependencies>
  • Configure the repositories for the MUnit dependencies and plugin:

    Repositories
    <repositories>
      <repository>
        <id>mulesoft-releases</id>
          <name>MuleSoft Releases Repository</name>
          <url>http://repository.mulesoft.org/releases/</url>
          <layout>default</layout>
        </repository>
    </repositories>
    Plugin Repositories
    <pluginRepositories>
      <pluginRepository>
        <id>mulesoft-release</id>
        <name>mulesoft release repository</name>
        <layout>default</layout>
        <url>http://repository.mulesoft.org/releases/</url>
        <snapshots>
          <enabled>false</enabled>
        </snapshots>
      </pluginRepository>
    </pluginRepositories>

MUnit has Surefire support built in. The reports output to target/surefire-reports.

Handling Parent POM Files

You can declare the MUnit plugin in a parent pom.xml file and every child project under this file can reference this definition.

To configure the MUnit Maven plugin in a parent-child POM relationship, include the MUnit plugin declaration in the <pluginManagement> section of your parent pom.xml file.

In the following example, the pirate-pom project declares the MUnit Maven plugin in its plugin management section, which defines a global configuration that each child under this parent can reference, override or even ignore.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0"
         xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
         xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/xsd/maven-4.0.0.xsd">
    <modelVersion>4.1.0</modelVersion>

    <groupId>org.pirate</groupId>
    <artifactId>pirate-pom</artifactId>
    <version>1.0-SNAPSHOT</version>
    <packaging>pom</packaging>

    <properties>
        <munit.version>2.1.0</munit.version>
    </properties>

    <build>
        <pluginManagement>
            <plugins>
                <plugin>
                    <groupId>com.mulesoft.munit.tools</groupId>
                    <artifactId>munit-maven-plugin</artifactId>
                    <version>${munit.version}</version>
                    <executions>
                        <execution>
                            <id>test</id>
                            <phase>test</phase>
                            <goals>
                                <goal>test</goal>
                            </goals>
                        </execution>
                    </executions>
                    <configuration>
                      <coverage>
                          <runCoverage>true</runCoverage>
                          <failBuild>false</failBuild>
                          <requiredApplicationCoverage>0</requiredApplicationCoverage>
                          <requiredResourceCoverage>0</requiredResourceCoverage>
                          <requiredFlowCoverage>0</requiredFlowCoverage>
                          <formats>
                              <format>console</format>
                              <format>html</format>
                          </formats>
                      </coverage>
                    </configuration>
                </plugin>
            </plugins>
        </pluginManagement>
    </build>
</project>

Inheriting a Parent’s Plugin

To inherit the MUnit plugin in your child pom.xml files, reference it in the <plugin> section of each child POM file individually.

The following sample references pirate-pom file as its parent and then declares the MUnit plugin in a <plugin> section without specifying its <version> because the MUnit plugin configuration is inherited from the <pluginManagement> section in the parent POM file:

POM child file sample
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="no"?>
<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
    xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/maven-v4_0_0.xsd">

    <parent>
        <groupId>org.pirate</groupId>
        <artifactId>pirate-pom</artifactId>
        <version>1.0-SNAPSHOT</version>
    </parent>

    <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>
    <groupId>com.mycompany</groupId>
    <artifactId>ninja</artifactId>
    <version>1.0.0-SNAPSHOT</version>
    <packaging>mule</packaging>
    <name>Mule ninja Application</name>

    <properties>
        <project.build.sourceEncoding>UTF-8</project.build.sourceEncoding>
        <project.reporting.outputEncoding>UTF-8</project.reporting.outputEncoding>
        <app.runtime>4.1.4</app.runtime>
        <munit.version>2.1.0</munit.version>
    </properties>

    <build>
        <plugins>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>com.mulesoft.munit.tools</groupId>
                <artifactId>munit-maven-plugin</artifactId>
            </plugin>
        </plugins>
    </build>
    </project>

Ignoring a Parent’s Plugin

Each child project under a parent pom.xml file can ignore the plugin referenced in the parent’s plugin management section and not implement the plugin configuration declared there.

By not declaring the Munit Plugin in your <plugin> section, you avoid inheriting the plugin declared in pirate-pom:

Child POM file not inheriting the MUnit Maven Plugin
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="no"?>
<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
    xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/maven-v4_0_0.xsd">

    <parent>
        <groupId>org.pirate</groupId>
        <artifactId>pirate-pom</artifactId>
        <version>1.0-SNAPSHOT</version>
    </parent>

    <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>
    <groupId>com.mycompany</groupId>
    <artifactId>ninja</artifactId>
    <version>1.0.0-SNAPSHOT</version>
    <packaging>mule</packaging>
    <name>Mule ninja Application</name>

    <properties>
        <project.build.sourceEncoding>UTF-8</project.build.sourceEncoding>
        <project.reporting.outputEncoding>UTF-8</project.reporting.outputEncoding>
        <mule.version>4.1.0</mule.version>
        <munit.version>2.1.0</munit.version>
    </properties>

    <build>
        <plugins>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.mule.tools.maven</groupId>
                <artifactId>mule-app-maven-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>${mule.tools.version}</version>
                <extensions>true</extensions>
                <configuration>
                    <copyToAppsDirectory>true</copyToAppsDirectory>
                </configuration>
            </plugin>

        </plugins>
    </build>
    </project>

Overriding a Parent’s Plugin

When inheriting the plugin from a parent POM file, you can also override the parent’s configuration. Overriding the plugin configuration from your parent POM file suppresses the original configuration requiring you to declare all necessary configurations again.

The following example overrides the console coverage report from its parent POM file, replacing it by the HTML report. Because the values from the other elements in the parent (<failBuild>, <requiredApplicationCoverage>, <requiredResourceCoverage>, <requiredFlowCoverage>) are not being referenced, this child file won’t inherit them and the default values will apply:

Coverage configuration in parent POM file
<coverage>
	<runCoverage>true</runCoverage>
	<failBuild>false</failBuild>
	<requiredApplicationCoverage>0</requiredApplicationCoverage>
	<requiredResourceCoverage>0</requiredResourceCoverage>
	<requiredFlowCoverage>0</requiredFlowCoverage>
	<formats>
		<format>console</format>
		<format>html</format>
	</formats>
</coverage>
POM child file overriding coverage report’s format
<plugin>
	<groupId>com.mulesoft.munit.tools</groupId>
	<artifactId>munit-maven-plugin</artifactId>
	<configuration>
		<coverage>
			<runCoverage>true</runCoverage>
			<formats>
				<format>html</format>
			</formats>
		</coverage>
	</configuration>
</plugin>

Setting Up Coverage

Enabling Coverage Reports

To enable MUnit Coverage, add the following configuration to the MUnit plugin configuration:

MUnit Coverage - Minimal Configuration
<plugins>
  <plugin>
    <groupId>com.mulesoft.munit.tools</groupId>
    <artifactId>munit-maven-plugin</artifactId>
    <configuration>
      ...
      <coverage>
        <runCoverage>true</runCoverage>
      </coverage>
      ...
    </configuration>
  </plugin>
</plugins>

Seting up a Minimum Coverage Level

The MUnit Coverage report can fail the build if a certain coverage level is not reached.

To make the build fail, add the following lines to the MUnit plugin configuration:

MUnit Coverage - Fail Build
<coverage>
  <runCoverage>true</runCoverage>
  <failBuild>true</failBuild>
</coverage>

After enabling the <failBuild>, define the coverage level. MUnit Coverage handles three different levels:

  • Application

  • Resource

  • Flow

The following example shows how to define the required coverage level:

MUnit Coverage - Require Coverage
<coverage>
  <runCoverage>true</runCoverage>
  <failBuild>true</failBuild>

  <requiredApplicationCoverage>20</requiredApplicationCoverage>
  <requiredResourceCoverage>10</requiredResourceCoverage>
  <requiredFlowCoverage>5</requiredFlowCoverage>
</coverage>

Each value represents a percentage.

If you define coverage levels but set the property <failBuild> to false, a warning shows up in the MUnit Coverage summary if the levels are not reached:

INFO] [CoverageManager] Printing Coverage Report...
[INFO] ===============================================================================
[INFO] MUnit Coverage Summary
[INFO] ===============================================================================
[INFO]  * Resources: 3 - Flows: 6 - Message Processors: 7
[INFO]  * Application Coverage: 71.43%
[INFO]
[WARNING] ----------------------------- WARNING --------------------------------------
[WARNING]  * Application coverage is below defined limit. Required: 100.0% - Current: 71.43%

If you don’t define a coverage level, MUnit Coverage assumes a -1 value, which indicates that the build won’t fail due to lack of coverage.

Ignoring Flows for Coverage Report

MUnit Coverage - Ignoring Flows
<coverage>
  <ignoreFlows>
	  <ignoreFlow>the-name-of-your-flow</ignoreFlow>
  </ignoreFlows>
</coverage>

<ignoreFlows> is a list, so you can ignore as many flows as you need:

<coverage>
  <ignoreFlows>
      <ignoreFlow>the-name-of-your-flow</ignoreFlow>
      <ignoreFlow>the-name-of-another-flow</ignoreFlow>
  </ignoreFlows>
</coverage>

Preparing Your Application

A placeholder must parameterize the part of the application trying to make use of a port. For example, to have your Mule application listening for HTTP traffic, provide the following configuration:

HTTP Application
<http:listener-config name="HTTP_Listener_config">
  <http:listener-connection host="0.0.0.0" port="8081" />
</http:listener-config>

<flow name="httpFlow">
  <http:listener path="/" config-ref="HTTP_Listener_config"/>
</flow>

The previous application always listens in port 8081. To make it dynamic, change it to:

HTTP Application with dynamic port
<http:listener-config name="HTTP_Listener_config">
  <http:listener-connection host="0.0.0.0" port="${http.port}"/> (1)
</http:listener-config>

<flow name="httpFlow">
  <http:listener path="/" config-ref="HTTP_Listener_config"/>
</flow>
1 Notice the placeholder ${http.port}.

With the application coded in this way and the configuration of Dynamic Ports in place, your application starts each run listening on a different port.

Enabling Surefire Reports

MUnit has built-in support for Surefire. No additional configuration is needed, but you can disable it if you don’t need it:

Disabling surefire reports
<enableSurefireReports>false</enableSurefireReports>

The reports can be found under ${project.build.directory}/surefire-reports.

By default, it is set to true.

Running Tests Using the Plugin

Running MUnit Tests for a Mule Application

Running MUnit tests in a Single Resource Mule project.
mvn clean test

Running a Specific MUnit Test Suite

By using the property munit.test, you can instruct the MUnit Maven plugin to run only tests that belong to a specific test suite:

mvn clean test -Dmunit.test=<regex-test-suite>

This path is relative to src/test/munit.

The property munit.test accepts regular expressions. The expression is applied to the name of the MUnit Test Suite file. The regular expression language is the Java implementation.

For example:

mvn clean test -Dmunit.test=.*my-test.*

You can leverage this feature by adding naming conventions to your MUnit Test suites.

Running Specific MUnit Tests

In the same way that you instruct MUnit to run one test suite, you can also configure it to run a specific test inside that test suite. You must use the property munit.test with the addition of the the special character # to append the test name:

mvn clean test -Dmunit.test=<regex-test-suite>#<regex-test-name>

It also accepts regular expressions. The expression is applied to the attribute name of the MUnit Test. For example:

mvn clean test -Dmunit.test=.*my-test.*#.*test-scenario-1.*

The tests inside the MUnit Test Suite that don’t match the regular expression are flagged as ignored.

You can also configure this from the pom.xml configuration:

<plugins>
  <plugin>
      <groupId>com.mulesoft.munit.tools</groupId>
      <artifactId>munit-maven-plugin</artifactId>
      <configuration>
      ...
      <munitTest>example-MunitTest-suite.xml</munitTest>
      ...
    </configuration>
  </plugin>
</plugins>

Running Tests Using a Specific Tag

You can run only the tests that you grouped under one specific tag:

mvn clean test -Dmunit.tags=<munit-tag>

You can also configure this from the pom.xml configuration:

<plugins>
  <plugin>
      <groupId>com.mulesoft.munit.tools</groupId>
      <artifactId>munit-maven-plugin</artifactId>
      <configuration>
      ...
      <munitTags>exampleMunitTag</munitTags>
      ...
    </configuration>
  </plugin>
</plugins>

You can specify more than one tag by separating them using a comma.

Skipping All Tests

MUnit leverages the same mechanism as Maven. To skip tests, you must use the skipTests parameter:

Skipping Tests example
mvn clean package -DskipTests

You can also configure this from the pom.xml configuration:

<plugins>
  <plugin>
      <groupId>com.mulesoft.munit.tools</groupId>
      <artifactId>munit-maven-plugin</artifactId>
      <configuration>
      ...
      <skipMunitTests>true</skipMunitTests>
      ...
    </configuration>
  </plugin>
</plugins>

Skipping Tests After One Suite Fails

MUnit allows you to skip the rest of the tests if one test suite fails:

<plugins>
  <plugin>
      <groupId>com.mulesoft.munit.tools</groupId>
      <artifactId>munit-maven-plugin</artifactId>
      <configuration>
      ...
      <skipAfterFailure>true</skipAfterFailure>
      ...
    </configuration>
  </plugin>
</plugins>

If not specified, this value is false by default.

Specifying The Runtime Product

You can specify the type of runtime in which your applications being tested will run. Accepted values are:

  • MULE for community edition.

  • MULE_EE for enterprise edition.

<plugins>
  <plugin>
    <groupId>com.mulesoft.munit.tools</groupId>
    <artifactId>munit-maven-plugin</artifactId>
    <configuration>
      ...
      <runtimeProduct>MULE</runtimeProduct>
      ...
    </configuration>
  </plugin>
</plugins>

Specifying the Runtime Product Version

MUnit allows you to specify the runtime version in which your applications being tested will run.

<plugins>
  <plugin>
    <groupId>com.mulesoft.munit.tools</groupId>
    <artifactId>munit-maven-plugin</artifactId>
    <configuration>
      ...
      <runtimeVersion>4.2.2</runtimeVersion>
      ...
    </configuration>
  </plugin>
</plugins>

Specifying The JVM

You can specify the JVM (or the java executable) in which your applications being tested run. You must populate the munit.jvm parameter with the path to the executable:

Specifying the JVM
mvn clean package -Dmunit.jvm=/path/to/jdk/bin/java

You can also configure this from the pom.xml configuration:

<plugins>
  <plugin>
    <groupId>com.mulesoft.munit.tools</groupId>
    <artifactId>munit-maven-plugin</artifactId>
    <configuration>
      ...
      <jvm>/path/to/jdk/bin/java</jvm>
      ...
    </configuration>
  </plugin>
</plugins>

Additional Argument Lines

You can pass additional argument lines to the JVM. Specify each argument in a separate argLine:

Argument lines
<plugins>
  <plugin>
    <groupId>com.mulesoft.munit.tools</groupId>
    <artifactId>munit-maven-plugin</artifactId>
    <configuration>
      ...
      <argLines>
          <argLine>-XX:MaxPermSize=512m</argLine>
          <argLine>-Xmx1024m</argLine>
      </argLines>
      ...
    </configuration>
  </plugin>
</plugins>

Environment Variables

To set additional environment variables during the test run, you can specify them with the respective key and value:

Additional Environment Variables
<plugins>
  <plugin>
    <groupId>com.mulesoft.munit.tools</groupId>
    <artifactId>munit-maven-plugin</artifactId>
    <configuration>
      ...
      <environmentVariables>
        <MY_ENV>exampleValue</MY_ENV>
        <MY_OTHER_ENV>val2</MY_OTHER_ENV>
      </environmentVariables>
      ...
    </configuration>
  </plugin>
</plugins>

As shown in the previous example, you can use environment variables to replace placeholders such as ${MY_ENV}.

System Properties Variables

You may need to define specific system variables so that your MUnit test runs successfully:

Setting system property variables
<plugins>
  <plugin>
    <groupId>com.mulesoft.munit.tools</groupId>
    <artifactId>munit-maven-plugin</artifactId>
    <configuration>
      ...
      <systemPropertyVariables>
        <my.property.key>my.property.value</my.property.key>
      </systemPropertyVariables>
      ...
    </configuration>
  </plugin>
</plugins>

Depending on the execution context, the system properties values may vary. When referencing these properties, it is a good practice to override their value to enforce test reproducibility.

You can do so using the ­-D argument when running MUnit with Maven. Variables passed with the -D argument take full priority over any other property. For example:

-Dmy.property.key=my.property.another.value

Redirecting Test Output to File

When running several tests, the build output can get very complex to read. MUnit allows you to redirect the output of each test suite to a file. This way, only the test results will remain in the build output and to you can check the respective file to check the standard output of each test suite.

These files are located in the testOutputDirectory folder following the naming convention: munit.${suiteName}-output.txt, where the suiteName represents the name of the XML file relative to the MUnit test folder.

The test’s output that doesn’t belong to a particular suite won’t be printed to keep the build output clean, but it can be enabled by running maven in debug mode.

To redirect the output of each test suite to a file:

Redirect test output to file
<plugins>
  <plugin>
    <groupId>com.mulesoft.munit.tools</groupId>
    <artifactId>munit-maven-plugin</artifactId>
    <configuration>
      ...
      <redirectTestOutputToFile>true</redirectTestOutputToFile>
      ...
    </configuration>
  </plugin>
</plugins>

By default, it is set to false

Test Output Directory

You may want to choose the location where the test output files will be created. The path specified can be absolute or written as a Maven placeholder:

Test output directory with absolute path
<plugins>
  <plugin>
    <groupId>com.mulesoft.munit.tools</groupId>
    <artifactId>munit-maven-plugin</artifactId>
    <configuration>
      ...
      <testOutputDirectory>/my/absolute/path</testOutputDirectory>
      ...
    </configuration>
  </plugin>
</plugins>
Test output directory using maven placeholders
<testOutputDirectory>${project.build.directory}/my/output/folder</testOutputDirectory>

By default, the files are created in ${project.build.directory}/munit-reports/output/.

MUnit Maven Plugin Configuration Reference

The MUnit Maven Plugin offers a set of optional parameters that can be configured.

Table 1. Maven Plugin Parameters
Name Type Description

argLines

List

Additional JVM argument lines to set on the test run.

coverage

Configuration

Coverage configuration to be set on the test run.

dynamicPorts

List

Dynamic ports to be set on the test run.

enableSurefireReports

boolean

Set value to true to generate MUnit test results in the surefire format.
Default value: true

munitTest

String

Name of the MUnit tests to run.

munitTags

String

Name of the MUnit tags. Only tests tagged with these names will run.

skipMunitTests

boolean

Set to true when you want to skip all MUnit tests.
Default value: false

skipAfterFailure

boolean

Skip all tests if one fails.
Default value: false

munitTestsDirectory

File

Directory where the MUnit tests reside.
Default value: ${project.build.directory}/test-mule/munit

runtimeVersion

String

Version of the Mule runtime in case By default it runes with the mule-version defined in the pom.xml file of the mule-artifact.json.

runtimeProduct

String

Type of runtime. Expected values are:

  • MULE for community edition

  • MULE_EE for enterprise edition.

By default, this value is taken from the requiredProduct parameter in the mule-artifact.json file.

jvm

String

Option to specify the JVM (or path to the java executable) to use.

By default, the JVM will the same VM as the one used to run Maven.

environmentVariables

Map

Additional environment variables to be set on the test run.

redirectTestOutputToFile

boolean

Set value to true to redirect the MUnit tests standard output to a file.
Default value: false

systemPropertyVariables

Map

System properties to be set on the test run.

testOutputDirectory

File

Directory where the test outputs will be written to.
Default value: ${project.build.directory}/munit-reports/output/

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